biblio, references, books, English:

Russian Cultural Studies: An Introduction by Catriona Kelly, David Shepherd; Oxford University Press, 1998

- Part 1: The Politics of Literature - 2: 'Revolutionary' Models for High Literature: Resisting Poetics - 3: Culture and Crisis: the Intelligentsia and Literature After 1953 - Part 2: Theatre, Music, Visual Arts - 4: Performing Culture: Theatre - 5: Music in the Socialist State - 6: Soviet Music After the Death of Stalin: the Legacy of Shostakovich - 7: Building a New Reality: the Visual Arts, 1921-1953 - 8: The Art of the Political Poster - Part 3: Cinema, Media, the Russian Consumer - 9: Cinema - 10: The Media as Social Engineer Frank Ellis - 11: Creating a Consumer: Advertising and Commercialization - Part 4: Identities: Populism, Religion, Emigration - 12: The Retreat from Dogmatism: Populism Under Khrushchev and Brezhnev - 13: Religion and Orthodoxy - 14: Russian Culture and Emigration, 1921-1953 - Part 5: Sexuality, Gender, Youth Culture - 15: Sexuality - 16: Gender Angst in Russian Society and Cinema in the Post-Stalin Era - 17: "the Future is Ours": Youth Culture in Russia, 1953 to the Present - Conclusion: Towards Post-Soviet Pluralism? Postmodernism and Beyond - Chronology of Events from 1917 - Analytical Index of Names and Places

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Changing Identities in the 1990s : ... 3. For Ralf Dahrendorf, for instance, "Europe ends at the Soviet border, wherever that may be" ( Reflections on the Revolution in Europe ( London, 1990), 110). Or, in the words of a Lithuanian quoted by Slavenka Drakulic, "Europe is . . . not Russia!"( Caf Europa: Life after Communism ( London, 1996), 31).

Where did Russians place themselves, in the world of postCommunist states that they inhabited after 1991? Did they, for instance, think they were Europeans? In 1996, according to another source, 9 per cent of Russians did so 'often' and 14 per cent 'sometimes'; but 17 per cent did so 'rarely' and much the largest group, 59 per cent, were 'never' inclined to do so. (392)